We Need Your Support, Donate to Mid-City CAN

rss-icon twitter-icon google-plus-iconfacebook-icon

Mid-City CAN Blog

Housing Federation trains residents on land use


Michelle Jaramillo, director of communications at San Diego Housing Federation, says the work her organization does is important because, “34 percent of San Diegans pay more than 50 percent of their income on rent.” Photo by Adam Ward
Michelle Jaramillo, director of communications at San Diego
Housing 
Federation, says the work her organization does is
important because, 
“34 percent of San Diegans pay more
than 50 percent of their income 
on rent.” Photo by Adam Ward
Part of the mission of organizations like the San Diego Housing Federation is to represent those in need of affordable housing to decision makers and the public.

But a new effort is trying to change that, and have resident leaders, including a core group in City Heights, speak for themselves about their needs.

Michelle Jaramillo, director of communications at the federation, said it is important because, "it allows for policies that are crafted and executed that are more responsive to the actual needs of San Diegans."

The California Endowment's Building Healthy Communities Initiative funds San Diego Housing Federation to do resident capacity building. The initiative is a 10-year, $1 billion effort to change the way that health happens in 14 communities throughout California, including City Heights.

Affordability

Jaramillo said housing affordability is an issue that has a huge impact in City Heights and San Diego.

"Affordability continues to decline in San Diego," she said. "Meaning real wages, in comparison to the cost of housing, continues to have such a large gap that residents are paying more and more and more toward housing."

Lack of affordability pushes people to unhealthy choices.

"Families who pay more than 30 percent of their income for housing are considered cost burdened and may have difficulty affording necessities such as food, clothing, transportation and medical care," according to the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development.

Half of San Diegans do just that, Jaramillo said.

And "34 percent of San Diegans pay more than 50 percent of their income on rent," she said. "The vast majority of that 34 percent are low- to moderate-income families."

The first part of the federation's Building Healthy Communities mission is advocating for policies designed to increase fairness and resources for those needing affordable housing, she said.

"The second branch is, OK what capacity, what education, what knowledge, what support, do [resident leaders need] to become a part of this dialog, this broader conversation on equitable land use," she said.

Jaramillo said that the federation's advocacy work is ongoing, but resident capacity building ramped up in January.

When those residents become fully trained advocates, the landscape of development decision making will change, she said.

"San Diego [will not be] just a place that is shaped by those with high-incomes or access to influence ... [when] residents are a part of that conversation," she said.

 

Add comment


Security code
Refresh

REACH US AT

(619) 272-7582

PHYSICAL ADDRESS:
4305 UNIVERSITY AVE.
SUITE 550
SAN DIEGO, CA 92105

MAILING ADDRESS:
P.O. Box 12319
SAN DIEGO, CA 92112



Quotation (Left)

The Mid-City Community Advocacy Network's mission is to create a safe, productive,Quotation (Right)
and healthy community through collaboration, advocacy, and organizing.




Fiscal sponsor Mission Edge San Diego.


COPYRIGHT © 1995-CURRENT, MID-CITY CAN. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.